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Insects Which Are Smaller Than a Dot

Take a step outside and it won’t take long for you to see an insect. They cover the earth and live in every habitat from the air to the under the earth. Some have evolved to live in subzero temperatures, while others can live in complete darkness. Insects come in all shapes and sizes. Some are so small you can only see them with a microscope. If you have ever wanted to know about tiny insects, here is your chance from your friends at Green Pest Services.

No see ums

no-see-ums
Photo Credit: http://keysmosquito.org/

These ones are not microscopic, but they are smaller than the period at the end of this sentence. They are small enough to fit through the spaces of your window screen. No see ums are like a tiny, angry mosquito. They fly, find something that has blood and then bite. No see ums are ferocious biters and they will leave you an itchy welt that might make you prefer mosquitoes.

Scabies

scabies
Photo Credit: http://www.medicinenet.com/

Scabies is not an infection; it is an infestation of a tiny mite. You will need a microscope to see this one. The scabies mite will borrow into your skin and lay eggs. The rash they leave looks like a hundred other skin rashes, but what sets them apart is the itch. People who get scabies often itch themselves bloody. One of the best ways to identify a scabies rash is to look for raised lines near the pimple like protrusions. That raised line is formed when a female mite burrows just under your skin and lays around twenty eggs.

Demodex

Demodex
Photo Credit: www.quora.com

Did you know that you have a mite living on your eyebrows? It is so small that you can only see them with a microscope. What they eat isn’t completely understood. Some think that they eat oils secreted by your body. Eyebrow mites don’t like dry areas; they favor your face since it’s the oiliest. Others speculate that the mite uses its retractable needle to pierce the cells around your hair follicles and drink the juices. Either way, Demodex is eating something on your face. If you are under the age of twenty there is a 4% chance that that you have Demodex invaders. On the flip side, if you’re over the age of 70, then there’s a 99% chance that you and your eyebrows are not alone. Since the mites are not transferred at birth, scientists speculate that Demodex is transferred from parents to children. You can thank your mom and dad.